St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

The Friese Foundation is proud to support St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, a pediatric treatment and research facility whose mission is to advance cures for pediatric cancer through research and treatment. St. Jude treats children from all around the world and has some of the best survival rates for the most aggressive childhood cancers. They are dedicated to providing the best care for patients and conducting innovative research to find cures, regardless of the cost. This is why no child is denied treatment based a family’s ability to pay, because all a family should worry about is helping their child live.

Since its founding 50 years ago, research-backed discoveries and treatments invented at St. Jude have helped push the overall childhood cancer survival rate from 20% to more than 80%, and for the most common childhood cancer, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, to more than 90%. In 2020, Researchers at St. Jude developed a powerful new tool to identify cancer-causing mutations in patients’ DNA, which will help scientists form a more complete picture of what causes cancer and point to better treatment options. This tool has been made available to researchers anywhere in the world. They also discovered a way to identify the genes responsible for drug-resistance to steroids – one of the primary reasons why leukemia treatment fails – as well as a drug that could make the steroids effective again.
 
The incredible work at St. Jude has made over 46 of its staff members the recipients of numerous awards for exemplary achievement. In 2010, St Jude was named the number one children’s cancer hospital in the United States (U.S. News & World Report). Most notably, Peter C. Doherty, Ph.D., of St. Jude’s was a co-recipient for the 1996 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for work related to how the immune system kills virus-infected cells.
 
Support for St. Jude will help continue this wonderful work accelerating scientific progress against childhood cancer and other life-threatening diseases, while giving kids the chance of a bright future.